Another Resource for Comics in the Classroom

First graders in the after-school program at the Bronx’s PS 90 spent part of last school year working collaboratively to create a comic book called The Bionic Butterfly. The title character, infected with pollutants, turned into a very strong, intelligent superhero butterfly with a mission to warn insects — and humans — about the dangers facing Earth’s environment.

A New Literary Hero: Comics Make for Colorful Project Learning

Critical Drawing:

This high school textbook treats comics like literature.

Credit: © 2006, Courtesy of McFarland & Company

This year, groups of kindergartners, first graders, and fourth graders are writing and drawing comics on the topic of bullying. “The kids get to color and draw, which they love to do anyway,” says Claudia Bostick, after-school coordinator at the school, whose program is funded by the After School Corporation and the Bronx’s Citizens Advice Bureau. “We can sneak in other art lessons in that context. And for literacy, it’s great. This encourages them to tell stories, to write stories, and to listen better.”

The program receives some help. The Comic Book Project, hosted by Columbia University’s Teachers College, supports the kids in their efforts. And according to Bostick, the project has increased the desire of her students at this low-performing school to learn reading.

But that’s nothing new. Educators have used comic books to teach reading for decades, says Michael Bitz, founder and director of the Comic Book Project, which began in 2001 and this year is reaching 850 schools and 12,000 children across the United States. However, he says there is one major difference now: “What’s new is the wider scale.” More than 50,000 kids have been involved since the project’s inception.

According to Bitz, the project and its peer programs “engage children on another level to create something that comes from them, reflects on literature, and reflects on characters and story lines.” He adds that the rise of graphic novels, in particular the Pulitzer Prize-winning, Holocaust-themed Maus: A Survivor’s Tale, by Art Spiegelman, has paved the way for wider acceptance of comic books as literature. “All of those graphic novels represent a real, viable component of literature.”

Follow the link to read the entire article: Comics Make for Colorful Learning | Edutopia

This entry was posted in Comics, Educator Resources, Outside Source and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *